Posts Tagged ‘Whitebox’

Swords & Wizardry Whitebox Character Record

May 19, 2015

I was (re)reading the Swords & Wizardry Whitebox rules and noticed that Whitebox breaks out movement based on the total weight a character is carrying, regardless of their actual Strength ability score.  It looks something like this:

  • 1-75 lbs = Move 12
  • 76-100 lbs = Move 9
  • 101-150 lbs = Move 6
  • 151-300 lbs = Move 3

The chart in the book is much cleaner than my crude replication, but it gets the point across.  Looking at the chart got me thinking about abstract inventory/encumbrance systems again.  Instead of using pounds/weight for each tier, use abstract inventory slots instead, broken down into 5 slots per tier.  A character can carry one item per slot, or 150 coins per slot.  Further, characters are restricted to carrying a single “heavy” item, such as a suit of plate mail, small treasure chest, a marble bust, or a rolled up tapestry or rug.  Really heavy items require two or more people to carry, and they count towards their limit of one heavy item (i.e. if you’re already carrying one heavy item, you can’t also help carry a really heavy treasure chest).

But, the best way to get my point across, I thought, would be to incorporate it into a character sheet.  And so, that’s what I’ve done, modeled off of an old OD&D character sheet I found posted at the OD&D forums.  And here it is:

whiteboxcharacterrecord

Click on me to download.

So, starting at the top of the equipment section, as you fill in gear, you can just cross reference to see your current movement rate (and chance to drown, should you fall into water).  It’s not perfect, of course.  For one, it’s not as forgiving as the Whitebox chart it’s based on.  Also, as you consume items, inventory slots will become empty in the middle of the chart, which can end up making tracking things a little more complicated (or else you’ll have to do a lot of erasing and writing things back into the upper slots); a little judicious forethought can minimize these problems (i.e. permanent items are recorded towards the top of the chart; consumable items recorded towards the bottom).

Let me know what you think.  Cheers.

 

 

Tales from the White Star Cantina

May 12, 2015

White Star has really gripped my imagination of late, so much so I’ve decided to start a second blog dedicated just to White Star material: Tales from the White Star Cantina.  Henceforth, most White Star related material will be posted there, and I’ll reserve this blog for non-White Star RPGs.

In the short term I’ll be reposting White Star material from this blog to the Cantina, just to get it off the ground, but in short order I fully expect to have new material: the Galaxy’s Most Wanted, Planets of Interest, advanced technologies, new classes, house rules, equipment, aliens, and more.

Cheers!

White Star RPG: Simple Feats

May 9, 2015

Well, White Star has got my creative juices following, so I’ll probably be on a bit of a White Star tear for a while.  I already wrote up some simple feats for Swords & Wizardry Whitebox, and Crypts & Things (also based on Swords & Wizardry), so I thought I’d do up some feats for White Star, as well.

Exactly how many feats to dole out to your PCs is left to the individual GM.  Personally, I think I’d let players pick feats at levels 1, 3, 6 and 10, but you may feel differently about it.  Unless otherwise stated, a feat may only be selected once.

The GM may want to omit or modify some of these feats, depending on the kind of game they’re running.  For example, if you’re running a Traveller-esque setting, where interstellar travel takes weeks, then you may want to omit the Hyper Comm feat for robots (which allows FTL communications).  Likewise, if you’re not really enforcing the turn-based timing mechanism of OD&D, then you may want to tweak the Fast Healing trait for aliens.

Per usual, please let me know if you have any questions or notice any errors.  Cheers!

White Star RPG Review

May 5, 2015

White Star Single Covers - FrontI’ve had a chance to read White Star cover-to-cover, and overall I really like what I see.  White Star, by James Spahn, is based upon Swords & Wizardry Whitebox, and the two games are fully compatible.

Like Whitebox, White Star is very rules light.  GM’s will be required to make rulings when situations inevitably arise that are not covered in the rules.  Such lighter rule sets also leave a lot of room for tweaking, modding and house ruling.  Both of these are good things, in my opinion.

While it’s clear that White Star is heavily influenced by Star Wars, the game pays homage to virtually every sci-fi setting on screen, from Dune to Firefly to Battlestar Galactica…even Doctor Who.  It just files the serial numbers off.

The four primary classes are Aristocrat (think Leia or Lando), Mercenary (Boba Fett or Jayne Cobb), Pilot (Han Solo or Wash) and Star Knight (i.e Jedi Knights or, conceivably, Time Lords).  In keeping with the toolbox nature of the game, alien racial classes are presented as archetypes: the Alien Brute (Chewbacca, Ookla or D’argo), Alien Mystic (Yoda, or Vulcans perhaps) and Robots.  I really like this approach to aliens, as it is infinitely expandable, works with any setting you come up with, and avoids the author putting their thumb in your game.  You could also have two Alien Brutes in your game, and yet they could be entirely different species.

Combat works pretty much like it does in most D&D variants, just with lasers and star swords.  And starship combat works just like personal combat, with the addition of Shields (which reduce incoming damage).

In keeping with old school D&D, White Star has no formal skill system.  This is one of the major differences between this game and other old school sci-fi RPGs, like Stars Without Number or X-Plorers.  However, if you desire a skill system, it would be fairly easy to bolt one on.  Say, steal the X-in-6 skill system from Lamentations of the Flame Princess, or base it on the thief’s percentile rolls.  Personally, though, I feel White Star works just fine without formal skills.

White Star has “spells” in the form of Meditations and Gifts, used by Star Knights and Alien Mystics (respectively).  Both use D&D’s fire-and-forget spell mechanism.  Overall the system works well, and is keeping in full compatibility with S&W Whitebox.  However, considering Meditations and Gifts, and the classes that use them, are obviously inspired by Star Wars and The Force, I don’t understand the need to have two different sets powers.  All the more so considering the relative paucity of Meditations and Gifts included in the base game.  It’s an easy thing, though, to simply combine them into one group.

Many of the monsters included are inspired by science-fiction movies: Daleks, Cylons, Klingons, sand worms, and many more, make an appearance, though with different names.  It may seem a cheap and hokey addition, but as I was reading the game it felt like it somehow just works.  I can easily picture a space dungeon filled to the brim with screaming Cannicks (Obliterate!  OBLITERATE!), ridge-headed Qinlons seeking honorable combat, and relentless Assimilants droning on about the futility of resistance.

Advanced Technology details the “magic items” of the game.  There’s a nice selection to get you started, including a small section on cybernetics.  It’d be easy enough to add dozens more items inspired by sci-fi movies and books, or based on D&D magic items.  Some magic items, like Ioun stones, are sufficiently exotic they could probably be ported over directly.

White Star is rounded out by a GM’s section providing suggestions for various campaign styles drawn from common sci-fi tropes; for example, rebels vs. empire, space traders, planetary invasion, murder-hobos with a spaceship (aka Firefly), and more.  There’s also a sample space sector and a starting adventure.

It would be nice to see a few additions.  The game is missing a technical class (the pilot kinda-sorta fills this role, but not completely), and I think it could benefit from a thief-like ‘scoundrel’ class as well (again, the Aristocrat can fill this role, but that doesn’t feel like a good fit to me).  Tables and charts for random encounters, as well as randomly generating planets and star systems, would also be a nice addition.

In my opinion, White Star does a really good job of being Dungeons & Dragons in space.  If that’s not what you’re looking for, if you prefer hard sci-fi settings, then this probably isn’t the game for you.  But if you just want to pick up a star sword and kill Daleks and Cylons in the nearest derelict space hulk, White Star is the game for you.

Btw, as far as I know, the 20% discount for White Star is still going.

Heads-up: White Star RPG

May 3, 2015

White Star OBS Template 6x9 132 Pages CaseboundJust wanted to give a quick heads-up about a new Swords & Wizardry Whitebox compatible game coming out tomorrow, called White Star.  As you might guess, it’s a sci-fi toolbox using the Whitebox rules set.

Tenkar’s Tavern has a quick preview of the first 56 pages.  It appears White Star will have a generic Star Warsy vibe to it, but if you don’t want to mix space-mysticism with your starships and laser swords, it ought to be easy enough to cut that material out and put in the sci-fi stuff you do want.

As for me, since it’s fully compatible with Whitebox, I’m thinking of combining certain elements of both games.  I’m not sure I’d want space elves and space orks, but certain D&D monsters have a space-alien vibe to them.  Things like Grell, Beholders and Mindflayers could be interesting additions to the game.

At any rate, I’ll be picking up the PDF tomorrow and I’ll post my thoughts on the game in a few days, after I’ve had a chance to look it over.  Cheers.

Robot Class for Swords & Wizardry Whitebox

November 21, 2014

retrorobots

The following Robot class is inspired by a similar robot class from the Henchmen Abuse blog, which you can check out here.  My version of a robot class requires a little more work on the part of players and the GM, and is designed for S&W Whitebox instead of Labyrinth Lord.

 

Robot Class PDF

 

Enjoy, and cheers!

Feats for Crypts & Things

August 28, 2012

Almost forgot that I did up these simple feats for Crypts & Things, modeled on the Swords & Wizardry Whitebox feats I did a while ago (here).

Here’s the PDF.  Enjoy.

What’s your ultimate Franken-system?

June 12, 2012

And by Franken-system, I mean mash-up of D&D editions and variants.

Here’s mine:

  • Probably use Sword & Wizardry Whitebox as the base – easy to run, easy to modify and plenty of material out there for it; plus it uses ascending AC and the unitary saving throw (maybe invert the saving throw to roll d20 + save >= 20)
  • Probably use modified d6 as damage for all weapons (light weapons do 1d6-1 w/ a minimum of 1; 2-handers do 1d6+1), because it’s A) simple and B) reduces the incentive for players to min-max their weapon selection
  • Naturally, I’d use my own S&W material (scroll down a bit), like the feats and classes
  • I like the idea of a unified XP advancement chart, ala 3E/Pathfinder, so I’d probably just grab the Fighter XP advancement chart from the S&W WB and use it for all classes in the game; may have to tweak the demi-humans a bit to compensate (especially Elves)
  • Just flat out steal the encumbrance rules from the excellent Lamentation of the Flame Princess (and maybe the skills too…not entirely sold on the necessity of a formal skill system, though)
  • I’m a fan of crazy gonzo, so I’d draw inspiration from sources like Carcosa, Planet Algol and Anomalous Subsurface Environment…and anything else that caught my fancy

What would your Franken-system look like?


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