Archive for the ‘DCC’ Category

Jury Rigged Weapons for Crawling Under a Broken Moon

January 15, 2018

umerica

Reid San Fillipo recently released the Umerica Survival Guide, based on his DCC fanzine Crawling Under a Broken Moon.  It’s a post-apocalyptic setting for Dungeon Crawl Classics, sort of a mix between Mad Max and Thudarr the Barbarian.

The Umerica rules add a new piece-meal armor system.  Instead of increasing Armor Class, armor mitigates damage.  Armor is represented by a die step (d3, d4, d5, etc.), which you roll to see how much damage is reduced by.  The really neat thing about this is that you can increase your armor die step by adding scavenged materials to it, and if you roll a 1 on the armor die, your armor degrades from the damage it’s taken.  It really gives the game a nice Mad Max vibe.

I thought a similar system for weapons would be cool, too.  What I propose is you start with some kind of base weapon.  In this case, let’s say it’s a wooden baseball bat.  Adding scavenged materials to the weapon increase the damage die by one step.  For example, say a bat starts with d6 damage; then you hammer some nails into it, increasing the damage to d7.  Then you find a strand of barbed-wire, and add that on, increasing it’s damage to d8.  After that, you wrap some duct tape around the handle, for a better grip, increasing damage to d9 (or d10, depending on how you follow the die chain), and so on.

However, each time you roll maximum damage on the die, it degrades a die step.  You swing the bat so hard, some of those bits and bobs you added break off.

A few weapons roll two or more damage dice.  In these cases, each modification upgrades all the dice rolled for the weapon.  However, if even one of the damage dice get a maximum result, the weapon degrades.  These are usually more sophisticated weapons which are more likely to break down in harsh apocalyptic conditions.

More advanced weapons with higher damage dice, like firearms and energy guns, are less likely to degrade, but they can still do so.  And players can add scavenged technology to try and repair or upgrade them in a similar fashion.  You could also use this as a system for improvised explosives.

You may or may not want to require a roll of some kind to see if the modifications are successful.  If you want to keep things simple, just assume that any character with an appropriate occupation, and the right tools, automatically succeeds.  Otherwise, require a Luck check, or an appropriate ability check vs. DC 10 for simple things (like baseball bats), DC 15 for modern firearms, or DC 20 for advanced technology, such as lasers and deathrays.

Cheers.

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Panzersaur

July 28, 2017

Something for a little game project.  My work is crude, but it’s effective enough for my purposes.

DCC/WH40K Mashup – The Grim Dark Future Funnel

March 30, 2017

wh40kpic

A few weeks ago I ran a one-shot mashup of Dungeon Crawl Classics and Warhammer 40K (ish), which I called the Grim Dark Future Funnel.  The players rolled up a series of WH40K(ish) themed Level-0 characters who set about exploring a space hulk for salvage, xeno-tech and ancient relics.  The players had a strict time limit (in real time) to explore the ship before the Imperium blew it to pieces.

Not having time to map this stuff out properly, instead I just measured out inches for movement and range, and used templates for certain weapons, like grenades and flamers.  I improvised terrain using blocks of Styrofoam and a few other bits.

I allowed replacement characters to teleport straight into the space hulk, but I required a Luck roll to make sure they didn’t accidentally materialize inside another object…or person.

Highlights include the players deciding that firing automatic weapons into melee combat was an acceptable thing, accounting for a high number of funnel character deaths.  And the mad scramble to exit the ship before it blew up.  A handful of characters were oh so close to getting off the ship, but didn’t quite make it (sorry guys 🙂 ).

Here’s a link to the rules I came up with.  For small templates, use about a 1.5″ diameter, for large templates use maybe a 2″ diameter, and for flamer templates use a 12″ rule.  I bought some cheap 6″ rulers to measure movement, which is perfect for most character’s movement.  Psychic attacks are made using an opposed Personality check vs. the defender’s Will save.


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