Archive for the ‘DCC’ Category

DCC – Spell Addiction

June 7, 2018

dcc-wizard-1

For the uninitiated, in Dungeon Crawl Classics wizards roll a d20 to cast spells and compare the result to a chart to determine the spell’s ultimate effect.  However, if you roll a natural 1, you get a thing called spell misfire.  Basically, you screw up the spell and something bad happens.

So, a new idea for a spell misfire effect is Spell Addiction.  In essence, a caster becomes addicted to casting a particular spell.  If they don’t cast that spell at least once a day, they suffer a -1 die step penalty on all action die rolls until they do.

If the wizard happens to gain a second instance of spell addiction for the same spell, then they need to cast the spell at least twice a day, or suffer a -2 die step penalty on all action die rolls.  A third instance of spell addiction with the same spell is even worse, and so on.

How do you treat spell addiction?  Hell if I know, but I’m guessing it’s probably really difficult and involves a quest for some rare ingredient, or a visit to a health guru living on some distant mountain top.

This concept could be extended to other magic items as well.  Say, developing an addiction to healing potions, or an inability to ever part with your awesome magic sword, or you develop an intense fear of ever removing your magic armor because it would leave you vulnerably “naked.”

Granted, to a certain extent players already do some of these things, it’s just largely hand-waved or glossed over.  But there are times when it could be really interesting (“Sorry, you can’t bring your chaotic magic sword Lifebane to your meeting with the king, no matter how badly you ‘need’ it.”)

Another possibility, in the spirit of DCC, is to gain Spell Addiction on a spell check roll of natural 20 instead.  All that magical power going to your head, it’s a rush!  Every spell casting after that is just an attempt to chase that initial high of arcane power.

Cheers!

The Avenging Sun – Another Grim Dark Future Funnel

February 28, 2018

wh40kpic

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to run another Grim Dark Future Funnel session, my DCC/WH40K(ish) mashup.  This was a going-away game for a member of the group who’s moving out of the area.

Charon B had been shrouded by warp storms for over 5,000 years until, one day, it suddenly wasn’t.  Long range auspex scans revealed the presence of an intact Imperator class titan – the legendary Avenging Sun.  The 7,540th Free Company, the Lupus Dei (their god being money, not the Emperor), set their sights upon retrieving the long lost titan.  If successful, this would be their greatest pay day yet.

The PCs made up the insertion team, who’s mission was to enter and clear out the interior of the titan, as well as place four teleporter beacons, which would allow squat technicians to teleport the entire titan into the hold of an orbiting super-freighter.  Covered by 5,000 years of debris and sediment, there were only two points of entry:  a hatch on the top leading into the titan’s temple, or a massive pipe sticking out of the side of debris pile.

The party commander choose to enter through the pipe, which turned out to be the barrel of the titan’s mighty Hellstorm cannon.  They discovered this entry point was protected by a group of Nurgle cultists, who were easily dispatched with only a few rocket mishaps (explosive friendly fire FTW!).  Fortunately they didn’t set off the live shell nestled in the gun’s breach.

Unfortunately, all the corpses started moving again.  Another fight ensued, and the players found that dispatching Nurgle zombies was much harder than dispatching Nurgle cultists.  Careful to destroy all the bodies this time, they entered the titan through the barrel’s gas vents.

They had another encounter with a powerful Nurgle warband on the titan’s bridge, which was dealt with in fairly quick order.  Unfortunately, we were running short of time, and I didn’t want to miss the big event, so I hand-waved clearing the rest of the titan to get on with things.

grim dark future funnel 3

Here comes bad news.

While clearing the titan, cultists outside the titan had initiated a ritual, which culminated about the time the last teleport beacon was placed.  A colossal rift formed, belching forth a mighty daemon of Nurgle, easily as tall as a building.  The teleporters weren’t calibrated yet, so the team had to power up the old Imperator titan and go toe-to-toe with a mighty daemon for several minutes.

grim dark future funnel 2

Titan and daemon going toe-to-toe…along with a giant bag of Cheetos.

It was a close fight, for the Avenging Sun was almost destroyed.  But the teleporters activated just in time to save them.  Most of the insertion team made it off the planet, to retire to lives of unbridled decadence and luxury…save one chap who thought they weren’t going to make it and decided to jump-pack off the titan at the last second.  He got left behind.  Oops.

Thanks to my buddy Randy for the pictures.  Cheers!

Edit:  I should also give thanks to Randy for providing many of the Nurgle minis used  in the game, including the very nice Mortarion daemon figure shown above.

Jury Rigged Weapons for Crawling Under a Broken Moon

January 15, 2018

umerica

Reid San Fillipo recently released the Umerica Survival Guide, based on his DCC fanzine Crawling Under a Broken Moon.  It’s a post-apocalyptic setting for Dungeon Crawl Classics, sort of a mix between Mad Max and Thudarr the Barbarian.

The Umerica rules add a new piece-meal armor system.  Instead of increasing Armor Class, armor mitigates damage.  Armor is represented by a die step (d3, d4, d5, etc.), which you roll to see how much damage is reduced by.  The really neat thing about this is that you can increase your armor die step by adding scavenged materials to it, and if you roll a 1 on the armor die, your armor degrades from the damage it’s taken.  It really gives the game a nice Mad Max vibe.

I thought a similar system for weapons would be cool, too.  What I propose is you start with some kind of base weapon.  In this case, let’s say it’s a wooden baseball bat.  Adding scavenged materials to the weapon increase the damage die by one step.  For example, say a bat starts with d6 damage; then you hammer some nails into it, increasing the damage to d7.  Then you find a strand of barbed-wire, and add that on, increasing it’s damage to d8.  After that, you wrap some duct tape around the handle, for a better grip, increasing damage to d9 (or d10, depending on how you follow the die chain), and so on.

However, each time you roll maximum damage on the die, it degrades a die step.  You swing the bat so hard, some of those bits and bobs you added break off.

A few weapons roll two or more damage dice.  In these cases, each modification upgrades all the dice rolled for the weapon.  However, if even one of the damage dice get a maximum result, the weapon degrades.  These are usually more sophisticated weapons which are more likely to break down in harsh apocalyptic conditions.

More advanced weapons with higher damage dice, like firearms and energy guns, are less likely to degrade, but they can still do so.  And players can add scavenged technology to try and repair or upgrade them in a similar fashion.  You could also use this as a system for improvised explosives.

You may or may not want to require a roll of some kind to see if the modifications are successful.  If you want to keep things simple, just assume that any character with an appropriate occupation, and the right tools, automatically succeeds.  Otherwise, require a Luck check, or an appropriate ability check vs. DC 10 for simple things (like baseball bats), DC 15 for modern firearms, or DC 20 for advanced technology, such as lasers and deathrays.

Cheers.

Panzersaur

July 28, 2017

Something for a little game project.  My work is crude, but it’s effective enough for my purposes.

DCC/WH40K Mashup – The Grim Dark Future Funnel

March 30, 2017

wh40kpic

A few weeks ago I ran a one-shot mashup of Dungeon Crawl Classics and Warhammer 40K (ish), which I called the Grim Dark Future Funnel.  The players rolled up a series of WH40K(ish) themed Level-0 characters who set about exploring a space hulk for salvage, xeno-tech and ancient relics.  The players had a strict time limit (in real time) to explore the ship before the Imperium blew it to pieces.

Not having time to map this stuff out properly, instead I just measured out inches for movement and range, and used templates for certain weapons, like grenades and flamers.  I improvised terrain using blocks of Styrofoam and a few other bits.

I allowed replacement characters to teleport straight into the space hulk, but I required a Luck roll to make sure they didn’t accidentally materialize inside another object…or person.

Highlights include the players deciding that firing automatic weapons into melee combat was an acceptable thing, accounting for a high number of funnel character deaths.  And the mad scramble to exit the ship before it blew up.  A handful of characters were oh so close to getting off the ship, but didn’t quite make it (sorry guys 🙂 ).

Here’s a link to the rules I came up with.  For small templates, use about a 1.5″ diameter, for large templates use maybe a 2″ diameter, and for flamer templates use a 12″ rule.  I bought some cheap 6″ rulers to measure movement, which is perfect for most character’s movement.  Psychic attacks are made using an opposed Personality check vs. the defender’s Will save.


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