Archive for the ‘Creations’ Category

Dungeon Tactics – A light one-page skirmish wargame

August 18, 2019

dd123

I’ve been on a wargaming kick of late.  I particularly like skirmish wargames, mainly because they’re easier and cheaper to get into and require less hobby work to prepare.  They play faster, too.

The wannabe game designer in me is still there, and has been chomping at the bit to design a skirmish game of my own.  After a few aborted attempts, I think I’ve come up with something decent.  And it’s inspired by the wannabe RPG designer in me, by way of one-page RPGs (ala Nicolas Dessaux’s Searchers of the Unknown).

The intent is to create an easy to play wargame requiring as little additional buy-in as possible.  Many gamers probably already have everything they need to start: dice, miniatures and some kind of 1-inch grid playing surface.  Tokens or glass beads are also handy.

Dungeon Tactics can be played using any miniatures in the 25-32mm range.  One could also use cardboard pawns (say from Pathfinder) or even the cardboard counters WotC put out for 4th edition DnD.

For the playing surface, both Wizards and Paizo sell affordable (well, affordable by wargming standards, at least) dungeon tiles which are still in print.  Or you could dig out your old HeroQuest board, or use tiles from another dungeon crawl game, or use your Space Hulk tiles, or a Chessex battlemat, or one of many different pre-printed maps.  Or go down to Staples and get an easel pad with a 1-inch grid on it and draw your own maps.

Next up I think is Advanced Dungeon Tactics, with rules for campaigns.  Plus, magic items, and maybe races and classes, as well.  The concept is readily expandable.  Cheers!

DUNGEON TACTICS

DCC – Spell Addiction

June 7, 2018

dcc-wizard-1

For the uninitiated, in Dungeon Crawl Classics wizards roll a d20 to cast spells and compare the result to a chart to determine the spell’s ultimate effect.  However, if you roll a natural 1, you get a thing called spell misfire.  Basically, you screw up the spell and something bad happens.

So, a new idea for a spell misfire effect is Spell Addiction.  In essence, a caster becomes addicted to casting a particular spell.  If they don’t cast that spell at least once a day, they suffer a -1 die step penalty on all action die rolls until they do.

If the wizard happens to gain a second instance of spell addiction for the same spell, then they need to cast the spell at least twice a day, or suffer a -2 die step penalty on all action die rolls.  A third instance of spell addiction with the same spell is even worse, and so on.

How do you treat spell addiction?  Hell if I know, but I’m guessing it’s probably really difficult and involves a quest for some rare ingredient, or a visit to a health guru living on some distant mountain top.

This concept could be extended to other magic items as well.  Say, developing an addiction to healing potions, or an inability to ever part with your awesome magic sword, or you develop an intense fear of ever removing your magic armor because it would leave you vulnerably “naked.”

Granted, to a certain extent players already do some of these things, it’s just largely hand-waved or glossed over.  But there are times when it could be really interesting (“Sorry, you can’t bring your chaotic magic sword Lifebane to your meeting with the king, no matter how badly you ‘need’ it.”)

Another possibility, in the spirit of DCC, is to gain Spell Addiction on a spell check roll of natural 20 instead.  All that magical power going to your head, it’s a rush!  Every spell casting after that is just an attempt to chase that initial high of arcane power.

Cheers!

My Take on the Dungeon Escape Table

November 26, 2017

 

darkestdungeon

Darkest Dungeon CRPG

 

I’m gearing up to run an old school game at our FLGS, possibly on a regular basis.  This means that I’ll need to start and end every session in town, since I won’t know for sure who will show up from week-to-week.  But what to do if the party gets lost in the dungeon, or hasn’t exited by the end of the session?

Well, Justin Alexander’s Escaping the Dungeon! post fits the bill.  Well, mostly.  I did my own take on it, provided below:

So, if by the end of the session the party still hasn’t exited the dungeon (or the wilderness), each character rolls 1d20 on the following chart, adding their Charisma reaction modifier (reflecting the favor of the gods):

1d20 Result
1 Betrayal – Either reroll on the table, or choose to betray another character who would have otherwise escaped the dungeon.  If you choose betrayal, roll 1d6:  on a 1-4 that player rolls on this table again, and you escape unharmed; on a result of 5 or 6 both you and the victim suffer the fate rolled.
2 You have died; your body is still in the dungeon somewhere (along with your stuff).
3 You have died, but someone was able to drag your carcass out of the dungeon.
4 You have been transformed into a monster (i.e. zombie, werewolf, mind-controlled, etc.)
5 You have been captured.  If the party finds and rescues you by the next session, you’ll survive.  In the meantime, roll up a new character.
6 You have been petrified, paralyzed or otherwise incapacitated in a “preserved” state.  Party members may find and restore you at any time.  In the meantime, roll up a new character.
7 You escaped, but had to leave behind all of your equipment and treasure.  Hope you banked some money in town.
8 You escaped, but lost 1d6 pieces of randomly determined equipment/treasure.
9 You escaped, but are permanently altered by the experience (i.e. maimed, polymorphed, replaced by a doppelganger, etc.).
10 You escaped, but caught an infection on the way out (the Dungeon Funk table may be appropriate for this result).
11+ You escaped unharmed.  Time to party!

Results subject to DM interpretation depending upon the circumstances.

Cheers!

New Map

September 14, 2017

wizardsandwarriorsmap

Here’s a little something I threw together today, using the Outdoor Survival map as inspiration.  The idea is to use it as a campaign map for some kind of Braunstein style wargame.  However, looking at it now, I think it’d make a good point-crawl West Marches style map, too.

What do you think?

CASTLE KROM

September 4, 2017

Idea for a new OSR campaign.

Long have you tread the rocky roads and dust-swept plains of the Mutant Wastes, seeking legendary Krom. Many a boon companion died before your very eyes, taken by banditry, exposure and predation. Your only shelter in the blasted wastes, the tumbled ruins of long forgotten ages. The Lost Temple of Zol, Karg Dunaeth, the Blood Pyramids, and so many more. Someday you will seek them out again, to claim their ancient treasures. But for now, at last, you have achieved your singular goal, to stand before the iron shod gates of Krom. The long journey was only your first tribulation, for under the halls of Castle Krom will you be forged into a great hero. Here will you find fortune and glory. Or here will you die, forlorn and forgotten. May the gods have mercy upon you, for Castle Krom knows none.

So, a bit of this…

chucking fistfuls of these…

imagesVVBG42RA

so you can reave and slay your foes, like so…

at a scenic location, like this…

 

Fire and Ice Volcano.vsm

Castle Krom

using this as the campaign map (from the game Divine Right).

 

Castle Krom Campaign Map.png

Castle Krom right in the middle of things

So, the jist of it is, you roll d6’s equal to your character’s Hit Dice.  Each dice rolling equal to or greater than your foe’s Armor Class (3 to 6) scores a hit.  With a single roll of the dice you can slay many an enemy at once.  Players can easily roll for all of their followers and hirelings at the same time, as well, facilitating mass foe-reaving.  Characters can take a number of hits equal to their Hit Dice (PCs roll on a Death & Dismemberment table when reduced to 0 hits).  Steal wizards from Chainmail, throw in a thematic cleric and thief class, and away you go.

 

Panzersaur

July 28, 2017

Something for a little game project.  My work is crude, but it’s effective enough for my purposes.

Alien Scum: A new class for White Star

January 9, 2017
ariel-perez-1

Artwork by Ariel Perez

 

The universe teems with life, but not all of it is noble or enlightened. All manner of unsavory aliens throng the crowded space ports and hive cities of the known worlds, displaced and exploited, eking out a living any way they can.  These are desperate, dangerous beings willing to do anything to make a credit, and they’ve developed an equally dangerous skill set as thieves, thugs, snitches…and worse.

PFBB: Essential Monster Stats

July 14, 2015

First, sorry for my prolonged absence of late.  I’ve been busy with some RL things, plus I had a touch of blogging burnout.  I think I’m better now. 🙂

A friend has been running Rise of the Runelords at one of our FLGS, and for some reason it has sparked a renewed interest in me to run that Beginner Box campaign I blogged about some time ago.  So, reading through the BB rule books again, I finally noticed that the stat blocks given for Black Fang’s Dungeon (pages 2-15 of the GMG) are condensed to just essential combat information.

PZO1130-GoblinsIt occurred to me that it may be helpful to have these condensed stat blocks prepared for all the monsters in the BB (including the four from the supplements), so that one could easily copy and paste them into a document for ready reference.  And so I went ahead and did it: condensed stat blocks for all the official BB monsters, including a blank template so you can add new monsters, if you’re so inclined.  There’s a DOC version and an RTF version.

Note that the formatting appears screwed up when you preview it in Mediafire, but when downloaded it should be fine.

Please let me know if you notice any discrepancies, errors, or if you have any questions or suggestions.  Cheers!

Alternate S&W Whitebox Character Record

May 22, 2015

I’ve been tinkering around with the Whitebox character record a bit more.  This version assumes armor determines a character’s movement rate, but retains the overall 20 inventory slots.

Generally speaking (and feel free to adjust to taste):

  • No armor = Move 12
  • Leather armor = Move 9
  • Chain armor = Move 6
  • Plate armor = Move 3
Click here to download.

Click here to download.

It is perhaps not as realistic as tracking weight or some other systems that use inventory slots, but I think it gets the job done and is very easy to use.

Swords & Wizardry Whitebox Character Record

May 19, 2015

I was (re)reading the Swords & Wizardry Whitebox rules and noticed that Whitebox breaks out movement based on the total weight a character is carrying, regardless of their actual Strength ability score.  It looks something like this:

  • 1-75 lbs = Move 12
  • 76-100 lbs = Move 9
  • 101-150 lbs = Move 6
  • 151-300 lbs = Move 3

The chart in the book is much cleaner than my crude replication, but it gets the point across.  Looking at the chart got me thinking about abstract inventory/encumbrance systems again.  Instead of using pounds/weight for each tier, use abstract inventory slots instead, broken down into 5 slots per tier.  A character can carry one item per slot, or 150 coins per slot.  Further, characters are restricted to carrying a single “heavy” item, such as a suit of plate mail, small treasure chest, a marble bust, or a rolled up tapestry or rug.  Really heavy items require two or more people to carry, and they count towards their limit of one heavy item (i.e. if you’re already carrying one heavy item, you can’t also help carry a really heavy treasure chest).

But, the best way to get my point across, I thought, would be to incorporate it into a character sheet.  And so, that’s what I’ve done, modeled off of an old OD&D character sheet I found posted at the OD&D forums.  And here it is:

whiteboxcharacterrecord

Click on me to download.

So, starting at the top of the equipment section, as you fill in gear, you can just cross reference to see your current movement rate (and chance to drown, should you fall into water).  It’s not perfect, of course.  For one, it’s not as forgiving as the Whitebox chart it’s based on.  Also, as you consume items, inventory slots will become empty in the middle of the chart, which can end up making tracking things a little more complicated (or else you’ll have to do a lot of erasing and writing things back into the upper slots); a little judicious forethought can minimize these problems (i.e. permanent items are recorded towards the top of the chart; consumable items recorded towards the bottom).

Let me know what you think.  Cheers.

 

 


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